Statehouse Headliners

STATE HOUSE HEADLINERS 7/8

Work continues on new North Hero drawbridge;
2020 VTrans budget has ups and downs, too

By Guy Page
July 8, 2019 – The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) is replacing Bridge 8 on US 2 between the towns of North Hero and Grand Isle. This drawbridge is a historic twin leaf bascule bridge, and the only vehicular movable bridge in the State of Vermont. Construction began in June 2018 and the estimated completion date is in 2022. The contractor will build a temporary drawbridge prior to replacing the existing drawbridge so that impacts to vehicular traffic are minimized.

Traffic Phasing Milestones:
July to August 2018: one-lane, two-way traffic on the existing drawbridge
August 2018 to May 2019: two lane, two-way traffic on the existing drawbridge
May 2019 to May 2021: two lane, two-way traffic on the temporary drawbridge
May to September 2021: two lane, two-way traffic on the new drawbridge
September 2021: one-lane, two-way traffic on the new drawbridge
October 2021: two lane, two-way traffic on the new drawbridge
For stunning construction photos and more information on construction updates at the drawbridge, click here.


Budgets, like bridges, have their ups and downs. After Headliners last month reported on heavy new spending for transportation-based carbon reduction, many readers wondered whether our Legislature robbed Paving Project Peter to pay Carbon Reduction Paul. With the help of a legislator who was wondering the same thing, Headliners found a VTrans report outlining transportation funding winners and losers this year.

According to the report, the $616 million FY 2020 Transportation Budget is up less than one percent in total spending but up 2.8% for the “state share” alone. State transportation officials tout the spending increase as consistent with Vermonters’ wage growth. The budget reflects increased spending on carbon reduction, road maintenance, and bridges, while some (but not all) funding decreases are described as prudent reductions based on completion of major tasks. Virtually all information presented below is printed verbatim from the VTrans report.

Six Biggest Winners (by percentage increase):

  • $13 million for Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities. This is an $2.2 million increase (20 percent) over FY2019.
  • $34.9 million for Rail. This is a $5.3 million increase (18 percent) over FY2019. This budget will continue to focus on the Western Corridor projects with the goal to extend the Amtrak Ethan Allen passenger train from Rutland to Burlington.
  • $33.8 million for Public Transit. This is a $4.8 million increase (17 percent) over FY2019.
  • $93.9 million for Maintenance. This is a $6 million increase (7 percent) over FY2019. The increase is largely driven by the need to restore $1.6 million that was cut from the FY2019 budget last session, a 15% increase in salt costs, fixed operating costs increases, and a reorganization that transferred the Office of Highway Safety from Program Development to Maintenance.
  • $33.2 million for the Department of Motor Vehicles. This is a $1.8 million increase (6 percent) over FY2019.
  • $98.8 million for Bridge Programs. This is an $3.3 million increase (3 percent) over FY2019.

Nine Biggest Losers (by percentage decrease):

  • $20.9 million for Traffic and Safety. This is a $590,000 decrease (2.7%) from FY 2019.
  • $100.7 million for Paving. This is an $3.5 million decrease (3 percent) from FY2019. Based on 2018 pavement data, 13% of the VTrans managed highway system is in very poor condition, which is below the performance target of 25%.
  • $48.8 million for Roadway. This is a $3.2 million decrease (6 percent) from FY2019. This budget item will fund 15 culvert/drainage projects, 23 ledge removal/slope stabilization projects, 25 roadway/intersection reconstruction projects.
  • $63.6 million for Town Highway Programs. This is a $5.7 million decrease (8 percent) from FY2019.
  • $3.3 million for Transportation Alternatives. This is a $330,000 decrease (9 percent) from FY2019. This budget funds 35 projects, including environmental mitigation and bike/pedestrian, in 27 different communities.
    $680,000 for Rest Areas. This is an $65,000 decrease (9 percent) from FY2019.
  • $2.7 million for Park-and-Ride Facilities. This is a $1.2 million decrease (30 percent) from FY2019. The decrease is attributed to the completion of the Colchester facility. However, more than a dozen park-and-rides will receive funding for design, construction and/or upgrades.
  • $9.2 million for Aviation. This is a $4.6 million decrease (33 percent) from FY2019. The decrease is the result of the recent completion of some large Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) grant awards.
  • $908,000 for Transportation Building Facilities. This is a $670,000 decrease (42 percent) from FY2019.

For more details, see VTRANS report on FY 2020 program.

published by Guy Page, Page Communications
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See all news stories on the Vermont Daily Chronicle

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